Prelude to the apocalypse – Dang

Bangkok, Thailand

Most demons took whatever hosts they could get when they could get them. The lesser demons weren’t particularly choosy, the commanders of Hell turning a blind eye whenever they ventured to the cool place. If an opening appeared to a susceptible host, it was considered there for the taking.

Some humans were difficult to take, but others, like Dang, were prime fodder for the dwellers of Hell to use as they saw fit.

It was no comfort to Police Lance Corporal Dang that the demon who claimed him was so low on the hierarchy that he didn’t even have a name. Trapped in his mind, Dang watched as his body did things, heard the thoughts of the demon who raged against everything human. Normally the damage such a demon could inflict would have been limited, but Dang was a constable, and was thus able to not only walk about the Thai capital city as if he owned the place, but he was also able to walk about armed.

The demon had never seen a gun before, and the slaughter it could unleash excited him. A quick search of Dang’s mind told the demon that the M1911 pistol wasn’t the best gun on offer, but it was all the beleaguered officer had been able to afford. It carried seven rounds, and the demon had been excited to find two extra clips stashed away in a drawer.

You could perform a lot of mayhem with twenty-one bullets, especially where the demon wanted to go. Everything Dang knew, the demon could access. His host’s mind was not the world’s greatest fount of knowledge, but proved enough to give this demon the slaughter he so viciously craved.

With Dang’s futile resistance trapped in the borrowed head, the demon dressed the part expected of him, before leaving Dang’s depressingly small apartment. With no personal vehicle, the demon moved Dang’s feet with a steady stride, taking the host body onto the air-conditioned BTS Skytrain. The demon enjoyed the worried glances some of the commuters sent his way, many of the Thai locals holding a wary unease where the police were concerned. Whilst the Royal Thai Police contained many noble and dedicated officers, it was also blighted by corruption and the enforcement of harsh financial penalties for those citizens who came to its attention.

Normally, the host’s ride to work was on the back of a motorbike taxi, but the demon wanted to experience as much of humanity as it could before the body it rode ended. It found the cool air-conditioned interior of mass transit too cold for its liking, and muttered softly under its breath. Not something those seated around Dang were happy about.

After stepping from the train, Dang’s borrowed eyes leering at everything female throughout the trip, the demon found it more and more difficult to control itself. The urge to kill grew with every passing second, the demon’s new hand constantly twitching on the holster. Dang tried his best to stop what was coming, he really did, but the demon had already become too entrenched.

He made it to the desired destination without much in the way of incident, although many would remember seeing the agitated officer as he stalked the streets. Needless to say, upon reaching his chosen destination, the demon didn’t remove his shoes when he entered the Buddhist monastery. The demon did, however, remove the bullets from his gun, one at a time, into the bodies of the peaceful monks he encountered there.

Fifteen monks died at the hands of the demon, which was pretty impressive, seeing as how the first two shots fired went totally wide. Having never shot a gun before, the demon resorted to using the established muscle memory of Dang. After the initial surprise of what the gun could do, the demon soon found that Dang was an excellent shot.

The murder of innocents engaged in the act of worship weakened the gates of Hell just that bit further. Although it might not have seemed significant in a world accustomed to violence, every little act of terror added up to the time when the denizens of Hell were unleashed onto a sleeping and unsuspecting world.

 

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